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Class Action Lawsuit Says Aveda’s Hair Loss Products Don’t Work

By Anne Bucher

A class action lawsuit has been filed against Aveda Corp. over allegations that its hair loss prevention products are ineffective.

Minnesota-based hair products maker Aveda touts its Invati product line as “Nature’s Solution for Thinning Hair,” and charges more than $100 for a system that it claims is clinically proven to thicken hair.

Aveda claims that the Invati product line, which consists of a shampoo, conditioner and scalp revitalizer, reduced hair loss by 33 percent during a 12-week clinical trial. Aveda also promises that the “Invati system is clinically proven to reduce hair loss due to breakage to help you keep the hair you have longer.” According to the Aveda website, Invati consists of “an invigorating blend of ayurvedic herbs” that help to reduce hair loss.

Rivkie Berger, the lead plaintiff in the Aveda Invati class action lawsuit, insists that these claims are false. “In reality, the products do nothing of the sort and have no such capabilities,” the class action lawsuit says. “This false and misleading marketing enables defendants to unfairly capture sales that it would not make but for its deception, and also charges consumers a premium based thereon.”

Berger claims in the Aveda class action lawsuit that he purchased the Invati product line in March for a total of $119.63, including tax. However, he did not experience any of the benefits Aveda promised. Berger alleges that the products are marketed in such a way as to convince consumers that the products were a “solution for thinning hair and guaranteed some reduction of hair loss.” He further claims that Aveda’s marketing is designed to persuade customers that the products are most effective when purchased together as a system, rather than simply using one of the products in the Invati product line.

Berger accuses Aveda of violating the California Unfair Competition Law, Consumer Legal Remedies Act, the False Advertising Act and other state and federal laws. He claims that the company used misleading marketing to persuade customers to purchase an ineffective product.

In his class action lawsuit, Berger asks the court for preliminary and permanent injunctions to prohibit the company from advertising the Invati products as effective at combating hair loss. He also requests Aveda to return all revenue it has acquired due to its misleading advertising.

Potential Class Members include a nationwide class of people who purchased any Invati product within four years of the filing of the class action lawsuit. A separate class of California residents who purchased the Invati product line will also be potential class members.

Aveda is owned by Estee Lauder Inc., which also owns Clinique, MAC, Origins and Bumble & Bumble. It purchased Aveda for $300 million in 1978.

The plaintiffs in the Aveda false advertising class action lawsuit are represented by Michael Kelly, Behram Parekh and Heather Baker of Kirtland & Packard LLP.

The Aveda Invati Class Action Lawsuitis Berger v. Aveda Corp., Case No. 13-cv-05074, in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

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Updated July 25th, 2013

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3 Comments

  • MELVIN WILKES July 29, 2013

    when can i file?

  • Truth in the Beauty Industry December 28, 2013

    As an Aveda Salon owner in New York, I have looked at this lawsuit over and over searching my thoughts as to whether I should comment. Finally I made the decision to bring forward the truth not only about Invati but the Aveda Corp. as a whole. Firstly, the claims made by Aveda about Invati are questionable and although we have sold a lot of this particular line I have yet to hear from a client that it works and to the point we have had a lot of returns.

    Now let us look at Aveda as a whole. The claims that their products are free from chemicals leaves a lot to be desired – look closely at the ingredients and you will find chemical compounds in virtually everything they produce. The products are overpriced and do not function as per Aveda claims.

    Aveda as a company is a mystery, a cult and if you do not follow the cult you are put on a blacklist, and at least they are barbaric – the company is founded on lies and contrary to their mission is totally profit orientated with very little going to the salon owner and their staff. Aveda employees are brainwashed and not even slightly representative of the beauty industry. They are dedicated to the cult and will not entertain even the slightest critic of the Aveda product. Another point which should be brought into the public domain is that Aveda has lost over 18,000 salons globally since 1995. You may look for an answer to that statement and that is the product simply does not work and is very over priced. Aveda works on 80% profit which in simple terms is just not worth what you are paying for. I have thought very hard about making a statement about Aveda but believe the public should be informed. I have dealt with Aveda for more than 20 years and feel personal shame for deceiving the public. The truth is the truth Aveda is not a company of high moral standing with ethics and to quote a high profile colleague you must look toward a product that delivers in every aspect. I regret to say Aveda does not deliver in any sense whether it be to salon owners and their employee’s the public or their own staff. I am moving toward a major international product (Based in France) which even though it has certain problems does deliver.

    I would say that Aveda as a company is limited and equally for a company to make the claims of exclusivity that they do you only have to look on line to see they have sold out ie the statement that it is only available in salons and selected outlets – it is in selected Walgreen’s, CVS, Amazon, Nordstrom ebay etc. this is intentional diversion and at some point will be available in other outlets such as supermarkets.

    In summing up the beauty industry is built on a foundation of lies and Aveda probably the worst, look at the facts. The President of Aveda with his salary of $1.7m p.a, plus profit share has nothing to lose and his thought’s extend firstly to personal gain rather than to the public which he publicly stated in a supposed private function in Minneapolis. Look closely at Invati and the false claims and equally scrutinize the entire Aveda range. If you want a good product within this industry then you should look toward the French products whereby ample money is invested in research and does for the most part deliver.

    • Shark January 27, 2014

      As this goes on we can only think of the deceit of Aveda President Dominique Conseil a Swedish National who pretends to be an all knowing Frenchman of the beauty industry and his conspirator William Lauder a cheating scandal ridden multi billionaire (google his divorce outrage). Aveda cheats, as do the Lauder brands. The Aveda product is far from the natural ingredients it pretends to be with all of their products containing chemicals. Now they are selling out on their long standing salon owners by trying to make up their loss by putting their products in Target, supermarkets nationwide, drugstores, Nordstrom and any clown who will take it. Trust Conseil? Trust the Lauders? Think again! Invati does not work nor do their other products. They are just unleashing a low level high priced product onto the American public which Conseil says “a stupid people”. Judge for yourself.

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